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Communication for Second Language Learners: Podcast Episode Live!
PFAU 34 Pfau pfau cartoon icon 01 e1596249701666 300x240 Communication for Second Language Learners: Podcast Episode Live!

We interview Catherine Steele, a pronunciation coach, accent reduction specialist, and owner of English Pronunciation of Success.

HIGHLIGHTS

Importance of proper pronunciation

Commonly mispronounced words

Client success stories

Advice for international students

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To get more help with professional development and writing, book a 20 minute discovery call with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Careers in the Arts – Social Work: Interview With Janelle Lewis

 Janelle Lewis is a social worker in the Toronto area who has experience working with vulnerable populations. While jobs in the sciences are sometimes considered to be “practical” an arts degree provides skills and opportunities, which can be used for careers that make meaningful differences to the community.

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Over the past two years, Janelle has worked as a Program Resource Worker within the Regent Park community, where she manages intensive cases in supportive housing and provides life skills training and interventions to those experiencing mental health struggles.

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What inspired you to get into social work?

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The first thing would be the area that I grew up in as a child and the second thing would be coming from a working-class family. So, to further elaborate, the area that I grew up in, it was predominantly an area that had a lot more crime than other parts of Toronto and it was home to a lot of working-class, immigrant families. And at the time when I was a child, there was a shortage of social services. So, that definitely made me think about how I could contribute to my community. Just seeing my parents struggle made me think about what I could do for people who are also living in poverty or living in low income, and just seeing how I can make a better impact on them.

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What has been the most meaningful part of your career so far?

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So, currently, where I work in Regent Park, I work with those who experience mental health issues. I would say just hearing a thank you and how I’ve helped them, is honestly the most meaningful part of my career. A lot of my residency experience anxiety and paranoia, and just seeing where they’ve come at the beginning of when we started working together until a few years later and how they’ve developed skills and coping strategies and they’re stabilized and much more independent. As an outreach worker, I work with a lot of people who experience poverty and homelessness. So, for them to share their story about how they got there and the struggles and the struggles that they’re experiencing. It definitely is so meaningful for them to find some sort of comfort or trust to share that story.

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What are some of the challenges of being a social worker?

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I mean, within the social work profession, it can be a very heavy and emotional job just because we’re experiencing a lot of stressful, traumatic situations. Number one would be taking my work home with me. I’ve gotten a lot better at this where I say okay if I end at five o’clock, that’s it. I’m going to be in the present moment, and I’m going to go home. But sometimes I do hear some very difficult stories. And I’m a very sensitive person. So, after hearing some difficult stuff, or just maybe seeing a crisis that I was assisting with, and going home with that I just sometimes need time to reflect on what happened. The second challenge that I would say is wanting to do more with me that people are experiencing homelessness. I want to do more. I wish I could provide housing, I wish I could spend a little extra more time with my residents who are experiencing isolation. But at the same time, I have to remind myself that sometimes you can only do so much.

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What is the process of becoming qualified as a social worker?

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There are so many different ways of becoming a registered social worker. I attended George Brown College for the Social Service Worker programme, which is a two-year programme. And the reason why I decided to go to George Brown College rather than University is that I wasn’t exactly sure whether social work was the career I wanted to go into. I felt that it was very daunting and scary committing for years and to a degree that I wasn’t exactly sure about and it made me feel better knowing George Brown College that they provide placement for both years. So, once I graduated from George Brown, I transferred to York, and I did a double major. So, I double majored in sociology and social work. If you have your bachelor’s in social work, you can stop there and you’re asked to sign up as a registered social worker, but then sometimes people want to continue their education. So, for me, I’m going back to school for my Master’s in social work.

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Thank you, Janelle, for sharing the excellent advice with us and our readers! 

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Book Mentioned in the Episode

The Lemon Tree by Sandy Tolan

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Missed the podcast? Listen here:

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For more advice about professional development and writing, check out our weekly podcast or subscribe to our monthly newsletter.

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To get more help with your assignments, book a 20 minute discovery session with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Careers in the Arts – Social Work: Podcast Episode Live!
Housing 300x300 Careers in the Arts   Social Work: Podcast Episode Live!

We interview Janelle Lewis, a Program Resources Worker in the Regent Park community of Toronto and volunteer with vulnerable populations. 

HIGHLIGHTS

Janelle’s reasons for pursuing social work

Challenges and rewards of being a social worker

The process of becoming a social worker

Attending grad school in the fall

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To get more help with professional development and writing, book a 20 minute discovery call with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Finding Your Dream Career: Interview With Luki Danukarjanto

Luki Danukarjanto is the CEO of FOCUS.inspired, a unique business that focuses on helping individuals to find their professional passion. A number of our readers are likely graduating and headed into the workforce during a very tricky time. It can be hard to not get discouraged about your professional future during COVID, but if you know what you are passionate about it, it can help you to stay on track.

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Luki refers to himself as a career catalyst and “DJ” for professional development. Luki was a management consultant for 12 years before transitioning into career counselling in 2015. Since then, he has published a book, the SWIKE web series, and spoken at many schools about his passion for career development. 

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What do you think is the greatest challenge for young adults as they develop their careers?

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So my perspective is that there’s a lot of these kind of generalisations when people talk about young adults. Students and young adults go through school, they’re supposed to graduate they’re supposed to get a job they’re supposed to get married and have kids and moved to a house in the suburbs and and all that sort of stuff and then retire and have a good life. But that kind of supposed to and and that typical life trajectory is often not not true anymore. A lot of people who when they’re going through life, they actually have multiple career paths.

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You developed the acronym SWIKE to inspire a lot of your work. What does that mean and where did that idea come from?

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So I guess the start of writing the book was I had a colleague , who I used to work with who actually wrote a book. I’m like, oh, wow, that’s that’s amazing. I would have conversations over coffees with a lot of folks and it ended up being that a lot of the conversations were the same, right? So I figured, well, instead of me having to say all that stuff over and over again, why not just write a book. It was like 500 pages. And, I don’t know what this is. It’s like a reference manual. So, a friend in publishing helped me get in touch with with an editor. The whole concept of SWIKE came about where originally it was that the stuff you didn’t know you needed to know. So then SWIKE developed into the stuff I wish I knew earlier. It references my interest in mentorship.

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How you advise students to be able to shift from the learning to pass the test mentality to one of mastery?

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Yeah, I would say for them, it’s getting over that fear of failure, right? There’s a lot of judgement involved. And it goes back to kind of that conveyor belt of life. That you should be doing this. Oftentimes, others are not as critical as people think. Most people are afraid of people judging them and things like that. And I just had a conversation with someone with the perspective that fear is made up. It’s something that doesn’t really exist. One of the things is a lot of people misunderstand fear versus danger, right? Danger is real. But in terms of fear, like getting up in front of someone and doing a speech or presentation, well, that’s not going to kill you. Then once you’re past that, then you can just start learning and try to follow your your passions.

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Luki’s Book Recommendations

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Stuff I Wish I Knew Earlier: How to Unlock Your Career Potential by Luki Danukarjanto

Mindset by Carol Dweck

How to Be Everything by Emilie Wapnick

The Straight-A Conspiracy by Hunter Maats and Katie O’Brien

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Thank you, Luki, for sharing the excellent advice with us and our readers! 

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Missed the podcast? Listen here:

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For more advice about professional development and writing, check out our weekly podcast or subscribe to our monthly newsletter.

_

To get more help with your assignments, book a 30 minute discovery session with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Finding Your Dream Career: Podcast Episode Live!

PFAU 5 panel 5 300x300 Finding Your Dream Career: Podcast Episode Live!

We interview Luki Danukarjanto, CEO of FOCUS.inspired, on helping individuals to find their professional passion.

HIGHLIGHTS

Stuff I Wish I Knew Earlier (SWIKE) from Luki’s book

Education system reform

Developing practical skills for the workforce

Challenges young adults face and how to overcome them

Advice for the graduating class of 2020

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To get more help with professional development and writing, book a 20 minute discovery call with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Succeeding Professionally as an Introvert: Interview With Faris Khalifeh

We interviewed Faris Khalifeh, a Quiet Confidence Coach who coaches introverts to embrace who they are and leverage their natural strengths. The professional environment has traditionally favoured extroverts, especially for leadership roles. With everyone staying inside due to COVID-19, communications have shifted online, giving introverts an opportunity to take advantage of their unique skill sets.

%name Succeeding Professionally as an Introvert: Interview With Faris Khalifeh

Faris helps clients from different backgrounds, cultures and industries. He teaches courses at various colleges on business, leadership and personal development. Faris also founded the Vancouver Quiet Leadership Community, which recently launched an online discussion group for introverts called the Quiet Confidence Cafe.

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What exactly is a Quiet Confidence Coach?

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I coach introverts to embrace who they are and leverage their natural strengths. Seeing how being an introvert is like any other personality type, we both have our strengths and weaknesses. But for some reason, the culture and the world these days, gives more attention to or considers extroverts to be better in certain aspects like, leadership positions. It doesn’t matter if you are an introvert or extrovert, you can perform these roles. So that’s part of the work I do with capitalizing on the key traits through one-on-one sessions with clients. I also do group coaching and corporate training about how to bridge the communication gap between introverts and extroverts at work.

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What are some strengths unique to introverts?

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Number one, we’re introspective. Introspection and reflection is important. Studies show that introspection is a catalyst to innovation, and if you think about it, most innovative stuff happened when someone was alone in a lab or in a cabin. We’re also better at expressing ourselves in writing, because introverts need time to process information. We need time to reflect before we share our opinion. Introverts are also great listeners. they are able to actively listen which builds empathy. That sense of understanding leads to deeper, more meaningful relationships. Lastly, introverts thrive with one-on-one interactions.

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How can we use these strengths to our advantage in professional or academic settings? 

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You can take your time you can articulate what you want to say you can have the first draft, you can do tweaks, etc. These days, it’s important for writing articles or blog posts. Communication in companies are now via emails or slack. Another idea for writing is, let’s say you go to a meeting, and you’re bombarded with all the simulation. You could then afterwards go back to the desk and think about what you want to say then send an email. Another tip for introverts, if they are put on the spot and they don’t have the answer, it’s okay to tell that person, let me sleep on it and get back to you. There’s nothing wrong with that. You’re just asking for your needs and providing them something in return.

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Faris’ Book Recomendations

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The Introvert Entrepreneur by Beth Buelow

The introverted Leader by Jennifer Kahnweiler

The Dynamic Introvert by Leslie Taylor

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Thank you, Faris, for sharing the excellent advice with us and our readers! 

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Missed the podcast? Listen here:

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For more advice about writing, check out our weekly podcast or subscribe to our monthly newsletter.


Both the written, visual, audio and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Succeeding Professionally as an Introvert: Podcast Episode Live!

IntrovertPfau 1016x1024 Succeeding Professionally as an Introvert: Podcast Episode Live!

We interviewed Faris Khalifeh, a Quiet Confidence Coach on leveraging strengths as an introvert to better succeed professionally.

HIGHLIGHTS

Strengths unique to introverts

Using written communication as an introvert

How personality types influence professional development

How COVID-19 has impacted introverts and small businesses

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To get more help with your assignments, book a 30 minute discovery session with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

The Art of Poetry and Creative Writing: Interview with Christie Wong

We interviewed Christie Wong, the Creative Writing Instructor and Coach at PFAU: Academic Writing, about her experiences with poetry. Many people are intimidated by poetry, perhaps because they were forced to read it in high school. However, poetry is the simplest form of expression that anyone can do.

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Christie specializes in teaching creative writing, with a focus on poetry. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Toronto, Christie has travelled and lived in many countries, including Rwanda, Hong Kong, Central America, and the US. She uses her diverse educational experiences to help students from a variety of backgrounds.

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What are some of your favourite styles?

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I’m definitely one of those freeform people. I think this is pretty cliche, but I learned to appreciate the sonnet. It’s one of the more really complicated ones to write, but I really love the way the phrasing happens when you read it out loud. It just makes it takes meaning to another level. This is why like people don’t talk like Shakespeare anymore, but if it did, I think we would understand each other’s emotional complexities so much more.

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How did some of your experiences help you as a teacher?

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Yeah, my teaching background was pretty diverse. I started out as in a camp counsellor position at summer camps. And that taught me a lot of really great ways of facilitating in a simple manner. And then I transitioned into working with a group of women of different abilities. They all have different levels of learning disabilities. So a lot of them would be l be 20 something but their reading level would be grade two. I also trained to be a behavioural therapist, and I did that for about a year. So that was a really different way of teaching as well.

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What are some of your favourite aspects of teaching poetry and creative writing?

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My favourite parts, especially with adults, I think are the moments when they finally let their guard down. They’re like, “Oh, I can’t do this” because of some history or experience that they’ve reinforced in their own narrative. It takes a lot of loving and a lot of caring, to get them to think outside of that and start being curious about their own thoughts. With kids, they’re in a way, a lot easier, because they don’t have those things. They’re just ready to try any challenge.

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What sorts of resources would you recommend for people who want to learn more about poetry?

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It depends on how you learn. You got to always think about learning in relation to how you like to learn to set yourself up for success. There are a lot of resources like the Poetry Foundation, you can subscribe to daily, poetry in your email inbox. Otherwise, pick up a poetry book that looks interesting to you and just start reading one or two poems. If you want to keep continuing and learn more, I recommend picking up some books on writing, just to learn how to think about things or just be given suggestions. At the end of the day, your thoughts or poetry requires originality.

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Christie’s Book and Resource Recommendations

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The Artists Way by Julia Cameron

A Different Booklist – Bookstore

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Thank you, Christie, for sharing the excellent advice with us and our readers! 

Sign up to Christie’s poetry class here

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Missed the podcast? Listen here:

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For more advice about writing, check out our weekly podcast or subscribe to our monthly newsletter.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

The Art of Poetry and Creative Writing: Podcast Episode Live!

Pfau pfau poetry The Art of Poetry and Creative Writing: Podcast Episode Live!

We interview Christie Wong, Creative Writing Instructor and Coach at PFAU Academic Writing, about the importance of creative expression, through writing.

HIGHLIGHTS

Poetry content and styles

How to incorporate poetry into daily life

Resources for improving poetry writing

Information about her upcoming poetry course

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Sign up for Christie’s poetry class here

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To get more help with writing, book a 30 minute disovery session with us and start your journey to reaching your full potential on the page, and in life.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.

Webinar Review: Quiet Leadership for Introverts

Last week we attended Faris Khalifeh’s webinar, “Quiet Leadership”, hosted by Alumni UBC

QLeader Webinar Review: Quiet Leadership for Introverts

The webinar focused on how introverts can embrace who they are and leverage their natural strengths. 

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Differences Between Introverts and Extroverts

Introverts tend to need more time to think about a problem and arrive at a solution later, while extroverts are able to think and talk at the same time. In order to make communication between personality types more clear, it is important to take into account different needs. Introverts prefer to be given more information prior to a meeting and benefit from more frequent check-ins, compared to their extroverted counterparts who are more likely to reach out and ask questions.

Extroverts feel more comfortable with impromptu and verbal communication. On the other hand, introverts excel at written communication and require more time to “recharge” between interaction, making back-to-back meetings less viable. One of the most important take-aways was that introversion is related to energy management and not shyness, which is a common misconception. If you are an introvert or are managing introverts, this is something to keep in mind since approximately half the population is introverted.

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Book Recommendations

Good to Great by Jim Collins

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

Quiet by Susan Cain

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Stay tuned for an upcoming podcast episode with Faris on Saturday!

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For more advice about student life and career development, check out our weekly podcast or subscribe to our monthly newsletter.


Both the written, visual, audio, and audiovisual content of this post has been created by and is the intellectual property of Lisa Pfau and PFAU Academic Writing. Please do not replicate any of the above content without our consent. However, please do feel free to share this post and its authorship widely.